Priscilla King Gray Public Service Center Leadership Council

Leadership
Council

The Leadership Council advocates for the programs and activities of the Center. They contribute advice, volunteer time, and financial support, ensuring a strong and lasting foundation for public service at MIT. We are grateful for their steadfast support.


Paul Edelman ’78

Paul Edelman is the Managing Director of Edelman & Associates, an executive search and technical recruiting firm serving clients in software, financial services, and other technology-driven industries. Previously, Paul was Vice President of Staff and Organization Development for a successful high technology startup. Paul began his career at AT&T, where he served as an internal organization development consultant and then as Operations Manager for the startup of the American Transtech subsidiary. Paul is a member of the Hub Angels Investment group.

Paul earned his S.B. in Physics at MIT and a PhD in Psychology at Harvard. Paul is married to Julia Schlam Edelman. They have two sons, Abe and Eric. They live in Lakeville, Massachusetts. Paul’s MIT activities include President Class of ’78, Reunion Planning Co-Chair, Reunion Gift Committee, Tech Day Committee, UPOP TA, Community Catalyst Leadership Program Mentor, and ICAN Career Advisor.

What inspired you to get involved with the PKG Center?
There is a growing consensus among MIT alumni and students that MIT’s motto “Mens et Manus” (mind and hand) could be improved by the addition of “Cor” (heart). Students come to MIT with strong social consciences and the desire to make the world a better place. The PKG Center allows students to exercise their “hearts” so they don’t weaken from underuse amidst the pressure of problem sets and exams.

Favorite Project
Amos Winter’s Better Wheelchair Design

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Carrie Galehouse Frey ’77

Carrie Galehouse Frey earned a Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering at MIT and an M.B.A. at Harvard Business School. Upon graduation from MIT, she worked as a machinery designer at Polaroid Corporation. Later, after Harvard, she worked as a consultant at Bain and Company. She left Bain to join Softbridge Microsystems, a software startup in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She spent the next fifteen years in software companies where she worked in marketing, sales, product development, and general management, often joking that she did everything except write code. At Automated Reasoning Corporation (an early AI company), she was President and CEO. She worked as a business unit manager at Hyperion Software.

Carrie left the software industry when her third child was born. Since then, she has focused her energy on her children and community. She has been a soccer mom, a regatta mom, and a Cub Scout den leader. She served as the Communications Director and on the Board of Directors of the Junior League of Greenwich. She held numerous school volunteer positions and served for several years on the board of the PTA. She has held alumni volunteer positions at Harvard Business School, including serving on the Advisory Board of the Women’s Student Association. Carrie is a Partner in Greenwich Financial Services, a boutique investment bank founded by her husband, where she works part-time.

Originally from the Midwest, Carrie lives with her husband, William Frey, and children in Greenwich, Connecticut. Passionate about seeing the world, she has traveled extensively for both business and fun. She has visited more than fifty countries on six continents. For recreation, Carrie enjoys swimming, skiing, and golf. 

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Priscilla King Gray HM

Priscilla King Gray is a 1955 graduate of Wheaton College in Norton, Massachusetts, with a degree in English and Early Childhood Education. In 1978, she studied at the American Institute of Textile Arts and was awarded a teaching certificate in surface embroidery.

As partner of the Chancellor of MIT (1971–1980), the President (1980–1990), and the Chairman of the Corporation (1990–1997), Mrs. Gray has hosted students, faculty, staff, and visiting dignitaries to MIT, and has traveled extensively with her husband to various alumni club and development events.

During her long service to MIT, which began in 1957, she has been a willing participant on various Institute committees, including the Alumni Officers Conference Committee, the Client Teams for the renovation of the Stratton Student center and the creation of Edgerton Hall, a graduate student residence, and the advisory committee for the MIT Faculty Club. She has been a longtime member of the MIT Women’s League, serving as its honorary chairman from 1980 to 1990. She presently serves on the Consumers’ Advisory Council for the MIT Medical Department, and as Co-Chair of the Steering Committee for the MIT Public Service Center, a position she has held since the Center’s inception in 1988.

Priscilla Gray was awarded Honorary Membership in 1977 in the MIT Alumni Association. In 1985, she received the Lobdell Award from the Alumni Association for the Senior Dinners program, which she began in 1981. In 1990 the Alumni Association presented her with the Bronze Beaver—its highest honor—in recognition of distinguished service to the Association and its members as the Institute’s first lady. Wheaton College, her alma mater, honored her with its Alumni Recognition Award in 1992.

For thirty years, commencing in 1978, she taught crewel embroidery classes and workshops in surface embroidery under the auspices of the MIT Womens’ League. Her classes included students from all segments of the MIT community. Priscilla Gray also volunteered at the Boston Children’s Hospital, usually on the infant surgical ward.

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Karen Ha ’85, SM ’87

Karen brings over twenty-five years of experience in the venture capital business and the software industry. Karen was a Venture Partner at Athena Technology Ventures and a Director at StartingPoint Partners, venture capital firms that invest in high-tech, startup companies. Before that, Karen spent fourteen years in operating roles at enterprise software companies. As a Co-Founder and CEO of Savvio, Inc., an e-commerce software company, she raised $13 million in venture funding. Karen was Vice President of Worldwide Professional Services with Portal Software, an internet billing software company. Prior to that, she was Vice President of Interleaf, Inc. and Director at Oracle Corporation.

Karen received her B.S. and M.S. from MIT in Ocean Engineering and Systems Management. She currently serves on MIT Corporation's Visiting and Development Committees and Public Service Center's Leadership Council and has served as a director of MIT Alumni Association's Fund Board. Karen is a Co-Founder and Co-Chair of the board of Korean American Community Foundation of San Francisco, and she also sits on the board of Network of Korean American Leaders.

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Bonny Kellermann ’72

Bonny Kellermann graduated from MIT with an S.B. in Political Science (after changing her major eight times) in 1972. She then went on to the University of Chicago where she earned an S.M. degree in Social Service Administration in 1974.

Bonny returned to MIT in the fall of 1974 to work as Assistant to the Dean (subsequently Assistant Dean) of Students, then Associate Director of Admissions and Director of the Educational Council. She then went on to serve as Associate Registrar, then Recording Secretary. She currently holds the position of Director of Special Constituencies in MIT's Resource Development department.

Bonny has been very active with the MIT Alumni Association, having held positions as President of the Class of 1972, President of the MIT Club of Boston, President of the Association of MIT Alumnae (AMITA), and Regional Chair of the MIT Educational Council. She has served on numerous national committees, including the Board of Directors, the Fund Board, the National Selection Committee, the Awards Committee, and the Tech Challenge Games Committee. She has received a Lobdell Award and a Bronze Beaver Award, as well as numerous Presidential Citations, to recognize her volunteer contributions.

Bonny is an avid figure skater. She has been teaching a figure skating class at MIT since her student days. She also competed for twenty years on a synchronized skating team, and won the National Championship eight times with her teammates.

What inspired you to get involved with the PKG Center?
I have always had a strong interest in community service (going back to my student days and even my teen years). As someone who works at MIT, I have had the privilege of getting to know some of the students whose lives have been enhanced by experiences supported by the PKG Center. So when given the opportunity to serve on the PKG Center Leadership Council, learn more about the students being supported by PKG Center programs and how I could help with that effort, of course this was something I was eager to do.

Favorite project?
There are so many, it is truly hard to single out a single project. I particularly like the story of the leveraged wheelchair, which started out as an idea from a single student, Amos Winter, who then went on to share his experience with others as a graduate student at MIT, and now is a faculty member heading a lab at MIT that uses design to overcome barriers. Or Sanergy, a simply brilliant project that addresses sanitation problems and provides electricity and fertilizer by converting waste. Or Alia Whitney-Johnson, who was (I believe one of the first) students to turn a student project into a nonprofit business, a trend followed by many. Then there are the student groups supported by the PKG Center doing amazing things: Amphibious Achievement, which has a profound impact on the self-confidence and academic performance of low achievers in high school by coupling tutoring with excelling in rowing or swimming. Or Camp Kesem, where students dedicate themselves to providing a special camp experience for children whose parents have been afflicted with cancer. There are so many stories. And each year there are new stories. That's what makes the impact of the PKG Center so significant.

Why do you support the PKG Center?
The opportunity to engage in meaningful service during student years at MIT has a profound impact on the rest of the life of each of the students who have this experience. What they learn under the guidance of Center staff will be important to them for the rest of their lives as they consider ways to help various communities. These students are making a difference to the lives of people through their PKG Center service projects (which undoubtedly makes them feel good), but they are also learning that service is an important part of their adult life. I hope and expect that many of these students will go on to make a difference to people's lives in many ways after they graduate. I consider it an investment in a better future world to support the experiences that these young people have while they are students at MIT. And it also makes me proud that MIT people are making this difference.

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Joseph Levitch ’69 (Co-Chair)

Mr. Levitch is currently a principal in the Minneapolis office of Sullivan, Cotter, and Associates, Inc., a management consulting firm specializing in human resources consulting for the health care industry. He has over thirty years of experience as a human resources and compensation consultant.

From 1986 to 2000, Joe was a Partner of Towers Perrin, a global human resources consulting firm. He served as a consulting principal in the firm’s Health Industry Consulting Practice and held several leadership roles, including Regional Practice Leader for executive compensation consulting and National Practice Leader for physician compensation consulting. From 2000 to 2005, Joe was a managing director of Clark Consulting where he was responsible for the firm’s healthcare executive compensation consulting practice.

During his career, Joe has worked on and directed numerous engagements in compensation and human resources management. His clients include hospitals and health systems, academic medical centers and faculty practice groups, healthcare associations and alliances, managed-care organizations, and physician group practices.

Joe holds a B.S. in Civil Engineering from MIT (1969) and an M.B.A. from the University of Michigan (1972) Ross School of Business in Ann Arbor. He is the Midwest Regional Director of the MIT Corporation Development Committee, the Co-Chair of the Leadership Council of the MIT Public Service Center, and a member of the Alumni Association Program Committee. He served as Co-Chair for the Class of ’69 Forty-fifth Reunion Gift Campaign in 2014. Joe annually volunteers as a mentor-instructor in the MIT Undergraduate Practice Opportunities Program (UPOP) and is a member of the board of the MIT Club of Minnesota. For the past two years, he has served as the “Challenger” in support of the Undergraduate Giving Campaign.

Professionally, he is a member of WorldatWork and of the American Society for Health Care Human Resources Administration (ASHHRA).

What inspired you to get involved with the PKG Center?
I became interested in working with the PKG Center after meeting several students and experiencing their passion for the service projects they were working on. I was impressed to learn about what so many students were able to accomplish with limited resources, as well as by their desire to devote their time and energy to others in need of assistance, all over the world. I was also inspired by the commitment and enthusiasm of the PKG Center leadership and staff. It was easy for me to see the impact that my time and financial support could have on the work being supported by the PKG Center.

Favorite project?
I can’t think of one specific favorite, but the work that I find most meaningful are the projects done by students from less developed countries who return home and undertake projects of all types to address community needs related to improved living conditions, easier access to health care, and enhanced economic opportunity.

Why I support the PKG Center
I support the PKG Center because I strongly believe in its mission and I continue to be amazed at the impact that my financial support can have by enabling the wide range of projects undertaken by the students who are supported by the PKG Center.

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Elena McFann ’90

Elena McFann serves as Chief Executive Officer for UnitedHealthcare Medicare & Retirement’s Central Region. In this role, she is responsible for the financial performance of UnitedHealthcare’s Medicare business serving over 3.4 million seniors in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wisconsin.

Previously, as Chief of Staff for UnitedHealthcare, Ms. McFann served as senior advisor to UnitedHealthcare’s Chief Executive Officer. In this position, she defined and executed business vision, mission, strategies, and tactics to position UnitedHealthcare to meet the expanding health care needs of consumers across all stages of life. Prior to that, Ms. McFann led Network Strategy and Innovation for UnitedHealth Networks, successfully spearheading efforts to reinvigorate network offerings, drive strategies to better serve UnitedHealthcare’s customers’ diverse needs, and grow membership.

Ms. McFann has also managed UnitedHealthcare’s physician, hospital, and ancillary provider networks in the Pacific Region (California, Oregon, Washington, and Alaska) and served as Vice President, Physician Network Management, responsible for designing and deploying strategic tools, processes, and standards across UnitedHealthcare’s physician network nationwide.

Before joining UnitedHealthcare, Ms. McFann held positions at PacifiCare Health Systems, Corvel Corporation, MedPartners, and Ernst & Young. Ms. McFann holds a B.S. from MIT and an M.B.A. from Southern Methodist University.

As a current member of the Priscilla King Gray Public Service Center Leadership Council, Ms. McFann identifies new partnerships and resources to advance community service opportunities for MIT students. In addition, Ms. McFann serves as an MIT Educational Counselor and is a member of the International Healthcare Council for Project Sunshine, a nonprofit organization providing free educational, recreational, and social programs to children and families living with medical challenges.

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Kaia Miller

Kaia Miller is founder of Aslan Global, Inc., a Boston-based consulting firm advising governments, businesspeople, and community-based organizations in developing economies on competitiveness and economic development, and on the role of diasporas in building homeland competitiveness. She spent several years working with the Cambridge-based consulting firm The Monitor Group as a leader in its Country Competitiveness Practice and co-founded the spin out ontheFRONTIER (now The OTF Group) in 2000 before founding Aslan Global, Inc. in 2001.

Kaia has advised public and private sector leaders in Latin America, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East on issues related to competitiveness and economic development. Specifically, she has worked with entrepreneurs in dozens of industries to develop export strategies and global business networks. She has examined the government and private sector roles in building competitiveness, as well as the potential role of a country’s emigrant network. She has also worked with several countries on defining, building support for, and implementing their national visions for creating prosperity.

Kaia has developed and taught several seminars on economic competitiveness and business strategy, and is regularly invited to speak about competitiveness, emigrant networks, and economic development. She served as adjunct professor and member of the Executive Committee at the Master of Science in Foreign Service Program at Georgetown University and is author of Emigrant Community Networks: An Underutilized Opportunity for Developing Countries, and Prosperity Creators: Listening to Businesspeople in Developing Countries. Kaia is a member of the Presidential Advisory Council for the President of Rwanda. She serves on the boards of the New England Chapter of the United States Fund for UNICEF, the Maranyundo Education Initiative for Rwanda, and the John Winthrop School for Young Children in Boston, and is a member of the Priscilla King Gray Public Service Center Leadership Council..

Kaia received her B.A. in International Relations from Brown University and her M.S. in International Relations from the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown.

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Agha Mirza ’94, SM ’95

Agha Mirza is a Managing Director at Citi Global Markets Inc. where he heads the Canada Rates Trading Desk. His group trades Interest Rate Derivatives with institutional clients who are corporations, financial institutions, hedge funds, and government entities. Agha graduated from MIT in 1995 with Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees. While at MIT, he was invited to and inducted into national honor societies, Phi Beta Kappa, Tau Beta Pi, Sigma Xi, and Eta Kappa Nu.

Agha lives in New York City with his wife and two children. In addition to serving on the Priscilla King Gray Public Service Center Leadership Council, Agha (along with his wife) supports various educational causes including the Robert College in Istanbul, an American High School founded in 1863 that attracts the best academic minds of Turkey, and Developments in Literacy, a nonprofit organization that opens and operates elementary schools for females in rural Pakistan. Agha’s hobbies include golf, backgammon, and traveling.

What inspired you to get involved with the PKG Center?
We were introduced to the PKG Center because we were interested in supporting programs and organizations that were committed to tackling and solving humanity’s problems. The PKG Center has been instrumental in institutionalizing public service at MIT, promoting the finest traditions of the MIT community such as originality, ethics and hard work in an environment where the word "impossible" does not exist.

Favorite project?
Over the years, every project we came across exhibited extraordinary responsibility towards community needs as well student initiative and leadership. If we had to pick a few, we could say Recovers.org is the most meaningful due to its scope, Aasadeep Projects in India most inspirational due to its impact, and Amphibious Achievement the most interesting student project due to its unique approach to teaching.

Why we support the PKG Center
We support the PKG Center because by allowing excellent ideas to flourish "in the lab" and then immediately put to work "in real life", sometimes in as short a time as a semester or a summer, the PKG Center has proven itself to be an essential center for an institution whose motto is "Mens et Manus." We believe the PKG Center fulfills a vital role as the "Face of MIT" in the United States and around the world through the many projects it supports, as well as serving as an "Ambassador of Public Service" by setting an excellent example for other universities to replicate the Center’s vision and success.

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Burcu Mirza

Ms. Mirza has been serving on the Board of Directors and Executive Committee of Turkish Philanthropy Funds, the leading American foundation focused on Turkey since 2013 and on Leadership Council of MIT’s Priscilla King Gray Public Service Center since 2009. Ms. Mirza worked at JPMorgan Chase in the Fixed Income Derivatives division for five years with the firm’s institutional clients, such as international asset managers and hedge funds. She left her position as a Vice President in July 2003.

Ms. Mirza volunteered to increase awareness about bone marrow registry through Delete Blood Cancer, the largest nonprofit donor center globally, in 2011 and worked with the organization again in 2013 to provide a patient with a second chance in life. She served as the Alumnae Admissions Representative in Singapore for Mount Holyoke College in 2011 and 2012 and was awarded the Alumni Merit award in 2012 for her work. She coordinated a service learning summer project between MIT and Robert College of Istanbul in 2010 after spearheading a campaign to endow the school’s Banu Buyukunal Scholarship in 2008. She has been a longtime supporter of Developments in Literacy, a nonprofit organization that operates schools for girls in rural Pakistan.

Bolder Giving, a nonprofit organization that works to inspire and support people to give at their full potential, profiled Ms. Mirza as a Global Giver in March 2015. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics and Mathematics from Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, Massachusetts.

What inspired you to get involved with the PKG Center?
We were introduced to the PKG Center because we were interested in supporting programs and organizations that were committed to tackling and solving humanity’s problems. The PKG Center has been instrumental in institutionalizing public service at MIT, promoting the finest traditions of the MIT community such as originality, ethics and hard work in an environment where the word "impossible" does not exist.

Favorite project
Over the years, every project we came across exhibited extraordinary responsibility towards community needs as well student initiative and leadership. If we had to pick a few, we could say Recovers.org is the most meaningful due to its scope, Aasadeep Projects in India most inspirational due to its impact, and Amphibious Achievement the most interesting student project due to its unique approach to teaching.

Why we support the PKG Center
We support the PKG Center because by allowing excellent ideas to flourish "in the lab" and then immediately put to work "in real life", sometimes in as short a time as a semester or a summer, the PKG Center has proven itself to be an essential center for an institution whose motto is "Mens et Manus." We believe the PKG Center fulfills a vital role as the "Face of MIT" in the United States and around the world through the many projects it supports, as well as serving as an "Ambassador of Public Service" by setting an excellent example for other universities to replicate the Center’s vision and success.

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William Putt ’59, SM ’64, PhD ’67

Dr. William D. Putt holds a Bachelor of Science, Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees from the Sloan School of Management at MIT. As an undergraduate, he received the Carl Taylor Compton Prize for undergraduate activities. He served three years in the Air Force Space Systems Division working on reconnaissance satellite recovery programs, for which he received the Air Force Commendation Medal. He served as a research associate at MIT and was a consultant for Peat Marwick Livingston working on planning programming and budgeting problems for several states. In 1968, he co-founded Teleconcepts Corporation, an American Stock Exchange company of which he was president until he sold his interest in 1992. Teleconcepts manufactured in Asia residential and small office telephone equipment for U.S. operating telephone companies and large retailers of electronic equipment.

Dr. Putt currently serves as a director of Capital Work Force Partners Inc. in Hartford, a director of the Asylum Hill Children’s Zone, and a director of CCT Telecom Holdings Ltd. and several of its subsidiaries in Hong Kong, a telecommunications equipment manufacturer and natural resources company. Dr. Putt is a director of the Center for International Education, Leadership, and Innovation at Wheelock College, and is the chairman of the investment committee for an educational foundation in Boston.

Favorite project
I favor U.S. projects aimed at education of middle school and high school students. The project which has been of high interest to me has been Amphibious Achievement.

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James (Jim) Taylor ’65, SM ’67

Jim Taylor is a Sloan School alumnus who retired after a near-four-decade career with Exxon Mobil Corporation, specializing in executive compensation and development. He and his wife live in Houston, Texas where they are active in the Presbyterian Church and the lives of their nine grandchildren. His principal hobby is distance running, having completed over forty marathons, yes, including Boston.

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Caroline Wang ’86 (co-chair)

Caroline Wang graduated from MIT with an S.B. degree in Mechanical Engineering in 1986, and from UC San Diego with a M.S. degree in Applied Mechanics/Bioengineering in 1989. After working at Johnson & Johnson Orthopaedics as a design engineer and a manager, designing and manufacturing custom made hip and knee implants, she left the workforce to be at home with her children.

Since that time, she has served in a variety of volunteer roles in her local community, currently serving as parent association president and trustee at her children’s school. She is also an active volunteer for MIT, serving as an Educational Counselor and a member of the Leadership Council of the Priscilla King Gray Public Service Center. She lives in Menlo Park, California, with her husband, Mike Cassidy ’85, and their two children.

What inspired you to get involved with the PKG Center?
I like giving back to MIT in a way that feels impactful, not only to MIT or its students, but also to the rest of the world that desperately needs the solutions that PKG Center students are creating.

Favorite project
Too hard to pick a favorite!

Why I support the PKG Center
The PKG Center provides opportunities for MIT students to put theory into practice, to meet new people and cultures, and to be proud of themselves for making a real difference in the world.

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Eberhard Wunderlich SM '75, PhD '78

Eberhard Wunderlich retired as Vice President of Systems Engineering and Development from AT&T Labs in Middletown, NJ. He and his organization led the development of Internet application services including the AT&T Content Delivery Network and AT&T U-verse IP TV applications. The organization was also responsible for IP services infrastructure such as AT&T Maillennium email, PC clients, dial and transaction service capabilities, and Domain Name Service (DNS) capabilities. Dr. Wunderlich previously led the development of AT&T Voice over IP offers such as AT&T CallVantage Service, AT&T Voice over Managed Internet Service, AT&T Savings Line, AT&T Global Wholesale VoIP and AT&T Integrated Network Connect Service (INCS). Dr. Wunderlich has over thirty years of R&D and Product Management experience with AT&T.

Dr. Wunderlich received M.S. and PhD degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the MIT and a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Nebraska. He has traveled extensively internationally and is fluent in German. He is a member of the Priscilla King Gray Public Service Center Leadership Council and has actively supported the MIT IDEAS Global Challenge.

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Shahla Wunderlich PhD '78

Shahla Wunderlich is a Professor of Food and Nutrition in the Department of Health and Nutrition Sciences at Montclair State University. Dr. Wunderlich’s research findings in the areas of food and the environment, community gardens and heavy metal contamination, genetically modified food (GMO), and nutrition assessment and the life cycle have been published and presented at national, state, and international professional meetings. Dr. Wunderlich has served as a reviewer for many nutrition textbooks. She has received several grants from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to improve the health and well-being of the older adults in the community adjacent to the University.

Dr. Wunderlich earned her Ph.D. degree from the MIT in Nutritional Biochemistry and Metabolism. She is a Registered Dietitian. She has received many awards, most notably the Outstanding Dietetic Educator Award from the American Dietetic Association and the Montclair State University Alumni Association Outstanding Faculty Award.

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